health, wellness

To Rid the Disease

Screen Shot 2017-11-25 at 5.18.59 PMFor anyone that isn’t aware, PCOS is an acronym for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.  According to womenshealth.gov, PCOS is categorized by irregular menstrual cycle, too much hair on the face, chin, or parts of the body where men usually have hair, acne on the face, chest, and upper back, thinning hair or hair loss on the scalp, weight gain or difficulty losing weight, darkening of skin, particularly along neck creases, in the groin, and underneath breasts.

My battle with PCOS began when I was 10.  I had my first period then and from that moment they were never regular.  I didn’t think much of it at the time, but it was clearly the beginning.  Once I got into high school, my emotions went crazy.  Well, crazier than normal for me.  I was always crying or lashing out and I didn’t understand why.  Part of that was clinical depression, but part of it was the PCOS.  I was put on birth control at 16 to help with the regularity of my periods and my emotions.  It helped a little.

When I was 17, I went to a weight loss specialist and we figured out I had PCOS.  They prescribed me metformin and Lexapro on top of my birth control.  They also put me on a very specific diet.  Basically, I couldn’t eat carbs or fat.

This didn’t sit well with me.  I knew, of course, that I needed a lifestyle change, but cutting out whole categories of food was just not going to happy.  Completely erasing certain food set me up for a binge ( https://justlovingothers.com/2017/11/10/conquering-my-bed/).  My problem was not just PCOS, but depression and an eating disorder.

I didn’t realize at the time that I had to work on all three problems to be able to fix any one of them.  They were all intricately (and annoyingly) connected.  I struggled for years to eat according to the PCOS diet my doctors had put me on and I failed time after time.  I eventually gave up entirely because it was so discouraging.

As anyone could imagine everything got worse.  I gained weight, facial hair, my depression got worse, my binging got worse.  I was a dang wreck.

Despite basically not having a period, I somehow managed to get pregnant.  Twice.  I have no doubt that God worked miracles both times because I shouldn’t have been able to have babies.  Both births were high risk and needed emergency c-sections, though.

My weight and self-esteem continued to spiral out of control.  By the time I was 29 I was over 200 lbs and hated myself.  I ended up seeing a counselor that helped me get my eating disorder under control, but I was still unhealthy.

My doctors put me on birth control so that I would only have my period every three months, I couldn’t walk up the hill to my house (although it’s a ridiculous hill and I still hate it), I wasn’t eating proper food.

My friend introduced me to JuicePlus because my daughter had horrible potty issues.  Between my counseling and antidepressant and my new found knowledge of health and JuicePlus, I began getting the right food.  JuicePlus helped me get an extra 30 different fruits and vegetables in my diet each day and I felt encouraged to eat better because I FELT better.

After taking the trio for a few months, I realized I bled every month at the time I would’ve had my period.  That’s even over the prescribed birth control.  My body had started to regulate itself OVER modern medicine.  I decided to get rid of the birth control just to see what was really happening.  Sure enough, my period came without fail monthly.  After 20 years of dealing with PCOS and irregular periods, my body was finally doing what it was supposed to do.  I am still overweight, but my PCOS symptoms have severely decreased if not completely gone away.  Despite my weight, I’m healthier than I ever have been and so much of that is due to JuicePlus.  Let me know if you’re interested in overcoming your own health problems.

~JR

PS-I conquered that hill.  I freaking ran up that hill.

Screen Shot 2017-11-25 at 5.18.09 PMTo Rid the Disease-Opeth

“Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.” Womenshealth.gov, 26 July 2017, http://www.womenshealth.gov/a-z-topics/polycystic-ovary-syndrome.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s